Seven Card Stud Poker Game Rules

Posted by John Taylor on

(A Seven Card Stud hand at the end of the River Round)

(A Seven Card Stud hand at the end of the River Round)

Card Game Rules

Seven Card Stud Poker is a casino type game where the objective is to win the best hand out of a group of players. Players are initially given seven cards (hence the name). They then try to make the best 5 card hand out of the seven cards all the while betting against the other hands in play. Seven Card Stud is played with a standard 52 playing card deck with Aces high and 2’s low.

For other casino type games, see our guides for Blackjack and Texas Hold’em Poker.

If you are looking for cards to play Seven Card Stud with, check out a standard pack here or one of our more recent arrivals here.

Below is the list of hand rankings from least to greatest:

Ranking of Hands

High Card- If nobody has any pairs, the highest card wins.

One Pair

Two Pair

Three of a Kind

Straight- Five sequential cards that are not of the same suit.

Flush- Five cards that are of the same suit.

Full House- Three of a kind and a pair

Four of a Kind

Straight Flush- Five sequential cards that are of the same suit

Royal Flush- 10 through Ace of the same suit.

Set Up

To begin a game of Seven Card Stud, a dealer must first be chosen. To do so, a random player passes out cards from a shuffled deck to each person in the game. The first player to draw an Ace becomes the dealer for the round.

 

How to Play

The game begins by everyone placing an initial bet into the pot. For casual games, this is normally a dollar or two. Play then proceeds to the following five rounds: Round One, 4th Street, 5th Street, 6th Street, and River

(The order of play in Seven Card Stud)

(The order of play in Seven Card Stud)

Round One

The dealer then passes out two faced down cards to every player. These cards are called the “holes”. Next the dealer passes out a faced-up card to every player. This card is called the “door”. After the door is given to everyone, a round of betting occurs called the “bring-in”. The bring-in begins with the player who has the lowest valued card and proceeds clockwise to their left. Ties for the lowest valued card are broken by the suits alphabetically (e.g. the 2 of Clubs outranks the 2 of Spades). At any round of betting, players can decide to fold their hand and lose any bets they made in the pot.

4th Street

The dealer passes out a fourth card faced-up to any remaining players. A round of betting occurs starting with the player who received the highest 4th street or has the highest hand and proceeding clockwise to their left.

5th Street

The dealer passes out a fifth card faced-up to any remaining players. A round of betting occurs starting with the player who received the highest 5th street or has the highest hand and proceeding clockwise to their left.

6th Street

The dealer passes out a sixth card faced-up to any remaining players. A round of betting occurs starting with the player who received the highest 6th street or has the highest hand and proceeding clockwise to their left.

River

In the 5th rounds, the dealer passes out a seventh final card faced-down to any remaining players.

Each player then views their three faced-down cards and makes the best 5 card hand they can out of their seven cards without revealing it to the other players. A round of betting occurs starting with the player who has the highest visible hand and proceeding clockwise to their left. Once the round of betting ends, the remaining players reveal their hands and the pot goes to the player with the highest.

For additional information about the rules of Seven Card Stud, check out pagat's article here.

 

History

While the history of Poker is by no means definitive, many games scholars point to the French game Poque or the Persian game As-Nas as possible origins. What is definitive is that the game of Poker first became popular in the American south during the 1830’s. Throughout this time, gambling riverboats began spreading the game all across the Mississippi River and around New Orleans. At the time, con artists, called pokes by disgruntled players, would use the game to outwit rich tourist.

Originating within the American Midwest, Seven Card Stud didn’t appear until the mid-19th century. While Poker was spread by riverboats, Seven Card Stud was largely spread by the U. S. Military. After World War 2, the game was a staple at most casinos and continued in popularity until Texas Hold’em and other community card games overtook the gambling scene in the 1980’s.

For more information about the history of Seven Card Stud, check out this article here. If you are interested in the wider historical narrative of poker in general, check out David Parlett's article here

Variations

Seven Card High and Low

In High and Low, all general rules from basic Seven Card Stud apply except that at showdown players make two hands out of their seven cards, one high hand and one low hand. The pot is split between the highest and lowest hand. If the pot cannot be split evenly, the odd chip goes to the winner of the highest hand.

Razz

Razz is a lowball poker variant of Seven Card Stud. All general rules from basic Seven Card Stud apply except that the objective is to have the lowest hand at the end of the game. In lowball poker, straights, flushes, and suits are irrelevant. The ranking of lowball hands are as follows:

A, 2, 3, 4, 5

A, 2, 3, 4, 6

A, 2, 3, 5, 6

A, 2, 4, 5, 6

A, 3, 4, 5, 6

2, 3, 4, 5, 6

A, 2, 3, 4, 7

A, 2, 3, 5, 7

A, 2, 4, 5, 7

A, 3, 4, 5, 7

 

Interview with Inside the Casino

John Nielsen from Inside the Casino interviewed us during the summer of 2018. They know all about casino games and equipment and we were happy to talk with them about the playing card industry. You may view the interview here.

Looking for more card games to play?  Check out this article:

40+ Great Card Games For All Occasions

 

About the author: John Taylor is a content writer and freelancer through the company Upwork.com. You may view his freelancing profile here. He has a B.A. in English, with a specialty in technical writing, from Texas A&M University and is working towards a Masters degree in English at the University of Glasgow. You may view his previous articles about card games here and his LinkedIn profile here.

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Last update date: 08/24/19

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